Matisse Pattern Landscape

Matisse Pattern LandscapeThis Matisse Pattern Landscape was inspired by the artist’s love of all patterns. Not only the decorative forms he created, but also reproductions of tapestries, embroideries, silks and more. A recent donation of leftover wallpaper made this possible. I was lucky in that I was given just the right kind, those with large, rich and elegant patterns.

 

MATERIALS
• Chipboard, 9″ x 12″ or 12″ x 12″
• Wallpaper, scraps
• Scissors
• Glue

DIRECTIONS
1. Give each student a 12″ square of chip board for mounting. Pass out a variety of wallpapers cut in 12″ squares.

2. Students choose one main wallpaper for their background and glue it to the chipboard with heavy use of a glue stick.
3. Students choose a ground color and cut a horizontal shape to glue over the background paper.
4. Students draw a tree trunk on the back of the wallpaper to cut out and glue over the ground and background. Tree tops were drawn on another piece of wallpaper to cut out and glue over the top of the trunks.
5. Repeat this step in various sizes. Simplicity of all the shapes is encouraged.


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4 Responses

  1. Lori K
    |

    His patterns are great for kids!
    I posted some ideas, too on

    http://funart4kids.blogspot.com/

    Thanks for sharing your great ideas, Kathy!

  2. Anonymous
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    February issue of Family Fun magazine also had an idea for Matisse that I used with 5th graders called Pasted Spaces. Using chipboard and wallpaper or scrapbooking paper. Glue 2 contrasting pieces of patterned paper to the board, side by side. cut a floor shape, lining up the corner with where the walls meet. From magazines cut out pictures of windows, furniture, people, etc to decorate your room. This all follows Matisse’s theroy of “painting with scissors” after he could no longer use paints.

  3. Sun-Kissed Scholars
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    Love this one!! I may just do this with the kids. Looks fun!

  4. Judith
    |

    I went right home last night and made one of these collages. It looks amazingly good to me. I can imagine doing one a day for quite a while. It is a good way to memorialize precious scraps that have found no other use so far.

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